Double Delight: Gay Father Raised Adorable Twin Daughters, Winning the World Over

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We divide the day in half, with one of us caring for diaper and bottle changes while the other works. Adam Motz, one of the dads, said, “We both look forward to naptime. Even if they and their partner are unable to have children together due to their sexual orientation, every able-bodied individual should have the right to become a parent if they so desire. And while it may not be allowed in some nations, there are some where same-sex couples are permitted to adopt.

The American couple Adam Motz and Amadou Lam, who reside in Chicago and jointly raise their 10-month-old twins Reve Christine and Sky Khoudia, serve as an illustration of this. According to Today, egg donation and surrogacy allowed Adam and Amadou to have children. Since the girls’ birth, they have been posting updates about their lives on social media, particularly TikTok, under the name “2 Dads 2 Twins.”

The fact that people are connecting with it, according to 34-year-old lawyer Motz, “makes it even more meaningful. It’s like an album of our favorite moments.”

From the start of their relationship, they were extremely clear about one thing: they both wanted kids. Despite having met through a dating app, they decided early on in their relationship that they wanted to start a family.

Adam made it plain that he had to be married first even though I knew I wanted children. Time was running out, and I wanted to be around when I could start a family. The 40-year-old property manager Lam stated, “My back is already hurting. After deliberating, they decided to go with succession, and Motz recalled that his best friend, Amy Preister, had agreed to contribute her eggs if he ever needed them.

“In college, she promised, ‘I’ll donate eggs if you ever need one. In response to my question, she confirmed that she remembered saying it. replied the man.

“We ended up spending $100,000 from beginning to end, which included egg donor and gestational carrier costs, doctor’s visits, hospital stays, and other expenses.” In their roles as parents, both of them needed to adjust to their new lives, and thus far, the transition has proven to be successful.

“We split the day in half, so one of us takes care of changing diapers and bottle-feeding while the other works. We’re both looking forward to the nap,” said Motz.

In this regard, Lam emphasized that he learned a lot during the process.

“I am impatient by nature, but children teach me patience. I enjoy life more, and I feel like a child again, especially when we play with the children, which I didn’t get much of as a child (in Senegal),” he said.

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